1. wnderlst:

Engadin, Switzerland | Yves Beco

*adds to mile long list of places to visit*

    wnderlst:

    Engadin, Switzerland | Yves Beco

    *adds to mile long list of places to visit*

     
  2. You go lil guy!

    You go lil guy!

    (Source: octopusmotor, via newsweek)

     
  3. I’m so glad to see Banksy finally get around to doing my portrait… :P

New Banksy - social anxiety

    I’m so glad to see Banksy finally get around to doing my portrait… :P

    New Banksy - social anxiety

    (Source: thatbrokendream, via ratsoff)

     
  4. That’s one rabbit hole I’d climb into

    nevver:

    Into the woods, Catherine Nelson

     
  5. I’m not saying I would enjoy being punched in the face by Shakira, but I would totally enjoy being punched in the face by Shakira.

nbcthevoice:
a little mid-show sparring session. 

    I’m not saying I would enjoy being punched in the face by Shakira, but I would totally enjoy being punched in the face by Shakira.

    nbcthevoice:

    a little mid-show sparring session. 

    (via shakira)

     
  6. I love how delightfully odd my celebrity doppelganger Jeff Goldblum is. I desperately hope that it isn’t spoiled by it coming to light that he’s a serial killer that collects the pinky toes of his victims or something.


bbook:
“What color would you say that is?” asks Jeff Goldblum while peering at the flecked remnants of polish on my horribly bitten nails. “Would you say that’s silver?” he asks. “I believe it’s more of a periwinkle,” I reply, hiding my embarrassment with an awkward chortle. It’s an odd introduction to the actor, but one perfectly befitting for the subject we’re about to discuss—the meticulously-detailed and frosting-coated Europe-on-the brink-of-destruction caper story, Wes Anderson’s The Grand Budapest Hotel. And as no stranger to the wonder world of Wes, Goldblum knows the delicate intricacy of the beloved auteur’s worlds, and with the actor’s bizarre and ever-fascinating talents, always knows just how to inhabit them with the most pleasurable ease.
Having last worked with Anderson on The Life Aquatic a decade ago, Goldblum now appears in The Grand Budapest Hotel as Deputy Kovacs—a lawyer presiding over Madame D.’s last will and testament. Set in a fictionalized European country on edge of World War II, Anderson’s Budapest Hotel gives you all the confectionary aesthetic delights that we’ve come to anticipate from him, as well as the melancholy interpersonal conflicts and frenetic excitement of his past work—yet feels steeped in a deeper sense of disillusionment with the state of the world than we’ve become accustomed to seeing in Wes’ films. There’s a boldness and necessity towards the sharper edge of the cake knife that comes with setting the film in a time when the world was on the precipice of despairing chaos, and it’s all the more wonderful for it.
Last week, I sat down with Goldblum to chat about the experience of bring The Grand Budapest Hotel to life, palling around the hotel with the sprawling cast of characters, and the magic of Wes Anderson.
Chatting With Jeff Goldblum on Wes Anderson’s ‘The Grand Budapest Hotel’

    I love how delightfully odd my celebrity doppelganger Jeff Goldblum is. I desperately hope that it isn’t spoiled by it coming to light that he’s a serial killer that collects the pinky toes of his victims or something.

    bbook:

    “What color would you say that is?” asks Jeff Goldblum while peering at the flecked remnants of polish on my horribly bitten nails. “Would you say that’s silver?” he asks. “I believe it’s more of a periwinkle,” I reply, hiding my embarrassment with an awkward chortle. It’s an odd introduction to the actor, but one perfectly befitting for the subject we’re about to discuss—the meticulously-detailed and frosting-coated Europe-on-the brink-of-destruction caper story, Wes Anderson’s The Grand Budapest Hotel. And as no stranger to the wonder world of Wes, Goldblum knows the delicate intricacy of the beloved auteur’s worlds, and with the actor’s bizarre and ever-fascinating talents, always knows just how to inhabit them with the most pleasurable ease.

    Having last worked with Anderson on The Life Aquatic a decade ago, Goldblum now appears in The Grand Budapest Hotel as Deputy Kovacs—a lawyer presiding over Madame D.’s last will and testament. Set in a fictionalized European country on edge of World War II, Anderson’s Budapest Hotel gives you all the confectionary aesthetic delights that we’ve come to anticipate from him, as well as the melancholy interpersonal conflicts and frenetic excitement of his past work—yet feels steeped in a deeper sense of disillusionment with the state of the world than we’ve become accustomed to seeing in Wes’ films. There’s a boldness and necessity towards the sharper edge of the cake knife that comes with setting the film in a time when the world was on the precipice of despairing chaos, and it’s all the more wonderful for it.

    Last week, I sat down with Goldblum to chat about the experience of bring The Grand Budapest Hotel to life, palling around the hotel with the sprawling cast of characters, and the magic of Wes Anderson.

    Chatting With Jeff Goldblum on Wes Anderson’s ‘The Grand Budapest Hotel’

     
  7. Is there ANY day of the year that your forehead is more itchy than on Ash Wednesday? No. The answer is no.

    Is there ANY day of the year that your forehead is more itchy than on Ash Wednesday? No. The answer is no.

     
  8. kurtsnyder:

MAKIN’ BACON PANCAKES!

    kurtsnyder:

    MAKIN’ BACON PANCAKES!

     
  9. 

My bags are packed… let’s go.

Eytan Zana - Concept world

    My bags are packed… let’s go.

    Eytan Zana - Concept world

     
  10. Water damage

Valerie Hegarty’s Alternative Histories